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A Tea rose

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A Tea rose

Post by Dave on 5th December 2009, 17:29

Here's the only Tea I've bred. Old Blush x Octavus Weld. It's a slow grower and I would have lost it if Bruce hadn't budded a few. But it's building up now into a nice bushy shrub, not as twiggy as some. Reminds me of Mrs BR Cant but a paler shade.
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Re: A Tea rose

Post by Admin on 5th December 2009, 18:27

It's just lovely Dave... The darker veins are a really nice touch. Hey... talking about Bruce's chip budding... I'm going to have my first go at it to make a 'Francis Dubreuil' (and another one too) for you tomorrow... Dave... I have a spare plant of Rosa bracteata (very small one... will need a year in a pot before setting free), 'Fortune's Double Yellow', and 'Rosa Indica Major' (also quite small... but plenty of good roots) if you'd like them too.

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Re: A Tea rose

Post by Ozeboy on 5th December 2009, 18:52

Simon, the first vertical cut does nothing for growth but makes near perfect cambium contact possible with the second horizontal cut. This is what I feel makes the difference together with greater area of cambium contact.

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Re: A Tea rose

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 7th December 2009, 06:33

Simon, how did the chip budding go and did Alicia get any pictures off it.
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Re: A Tea rose

Post by Dave on 7th December 2009, 06:52

Thanks Simon. I would be very grateful.
I desperately want to start budding but will be away too much before Xmas:(
I think your pollen will be ready for posting tomorrow
Dave C

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Re: A Tea rose

Post by rosemeadow on 7th December 2009, 10:48

It is a pretty tea rose. Dave. It will be good to see how the bush and blooms look when it is more mature.

Simon, did you get to strike Foutune's Double Yellow ?
How is the one I sent latter ?

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Re: A Tea rose

Post by Admin on 7th December 2009, 22:13

David M: Didn't do the chip budding as my understocks were no good.. have cut about 100 new good understocks a bit thicker than pencils to strike and have them wrapped up in newspaper as we speak ready to go... was a bit disappoined actually. I also splurged and bought myself a brand new Victorianox budding knife as my old one is getting a little sad and I've beed using a snap-blade craft knife instead (which works well too but I like the feel of a good budding knife too).

David C: What would you be grafteful for??? All of them??? Do you want me to hold off till after Christmas when you are home more or send them now??? Can't wait for the Mons. Tillier pollen Dave... I've emailed you about the other things.

Karen: The first lot of FDY cuttings failed. The second rooted plant you sent is going great guns. When it arrived it broke apart into two plants and I potted both on and now both are growing... I'll pass this spare onto Dave to spread the joy a bit Cool

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Re: A Tea rose

Post by Ozeboy on 8th December 2009, 12:41

Simon, I have a stainless Victorianox and a carbon steel quality budding knife. Stainless is too soft to keep an edge, the carbon steel keeps an edge well but is a little too thick for me. I prefer (Personal choice) an Olfa snap blade knife which has a thinner blade which is about 20mm deep from cutting edge to blade back. These enable me to get thinner bud chips and the width is wide enough to guage the angle of the cut. The blade is angled at the tip so if you round that top edge slightly you have a good rounded edge to open the rind when doing T budding and other methods that require the rind to be lifted away from the wood. However the back bump on your Virorianox is great for lifting bark (Rind).
Olfa snap blade knives are available at most Wall Paper and paint shops or Bunnings. They are very easy to keep sharp if you buy a fine double sided stone with white Arcansis one side and medium to fine the other side. Use kerosene to prevent stone clogging and foating the steel and worn stone away.

Please be aware that I am not thrusting my ideas on others and realise there are a lot of different ways to graft plants, most very successiful once the main criteria for success are met. There are others that have their secret ( Black magic Bull"*it ) budding methods and all others are inferior.
Hopefully I have avoided being a big head that my ideas are right and all others wrong so far in this life. I do not wish to convert this site into a 90% budding site as there is a good mix of topics. Please excuse me if I BUD out of the grafting topic. I find great interest in Hybridising and follow all the words of wisdom from our experts , Bemo, David C and Simon. It is a great learning item for me so thanks to you guys.

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Re: A Tea rose

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 8th December 2009, 17:33

I found a $2.00 budding knife at cheap shop at Gulgong 2 years ago and has not missed a beat for me. It is as good as my 18 year old expensive one. I could be wrong but I the seven budders that we had over the years at the rose nursery used good old pen knifes, one had a very handy "Old Timer" brand, he would not part with it.
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Re: A Tea rose

Post by Admin on 8th December 2009, 17:41

I bought this as 'retail theray' Wink I was pissed off that I was so stupid in preparing that batch of understocks... looking back I don't know what I was thinking Rolling Eyes . So I decided to set myself up with good gear and prepare some understocks properly and slow things down a bit to do it better. I have a budding knife now that has been really good... but it is a combo thing with my secateurs and it is very uncomfortable to use (picture a Leatherman-like tool). Then I was using a cheap snap-blade knife.. about 2cm wide and this was good too and easy to keep sharp and by removing the sections between budding different varieties I was thinking that despite the fact RMV isn't passed on by pruning/budding tools I wouldn't be the first one to prove them wrong because I got rid of the blades, and so any infected material, regularly. Anyway... this knife looks to be fairly small and looks easy to use... and I'm looking forward to using it to have a go at budding new stock Smile


Last edited by Simon on 8th December 2009, 22:06; edited 1 time in total

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Re: A Tea rose

Post by Dave on 8th December 2009, 19:52

I'd like to try Rosa bracteata when it's big enough. Thanks v much. Good luck with the new knife!

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Re: A Tea rose

Post by Admin on 12th December 2009, 13:32

Dave (Clark), Just a quick note that I will not be doing you any grafts of 'St Francis Xavier' or of 'Francis Dubreuil' because I noticed this morning that my two plants are infected with RMV. I will be contacting the growers and shovel pruning these two plants instead.

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Re: A Tea rose

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