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'Madame Isaac Pereire'

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'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Admin on 21st August 2009, 19:46

Has anyone grown ''Madame Isaac Pereire' before? I'm wondering if the branches are pliable enough to be used as a pillar rose? It was sent to me as the freebie with my Treloars order and I read on HMF (see link) that it has been described as one of the most fragrant roses ever introduced. So I am wanting to plant it near the house but in an airy position because it is also rumoured to get mildew pretty badly.

LINK: [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Billndee on 21st August 2009, 21:22

I went to my reference books to see if there is anything helpful Simon. They all rave so much about the flower that not much is said about growth habit. But one book I have says the stems are "stout", and can be trained as a pillar rose or low climber.
I see that Susan Irvine has it listed as growing at her Deloraine home but she has no comments about it.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Admin on 21st August 2009, 23:54

Thumbsup thanks Dee Smile Might be a good choice for 'cartwheeling' too Hmmmm

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Meryl on 22nd August 2009, 21:35

Mme Isaac throws BIG canes, long, strong and far from pliable. I doubt whether you would have any luck using her as a pillar rose unless you were growing her up a stately Tara-style pillar. She goes well spread out against a tallish fence. The fragrance is as good as they say and, once established, she blooms and blooms and blooms. Haven't had powdery mildew; have had black spot but BS doesn't give her pause at all.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Carole on 22nd August 2009, 22:21

Mme Isaac is on our want list, but now I have read your post Meryl I will have to think of a place to put her. confused How are your roses going?
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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Admin on 23rd August 2009, 11:18

Hmmm.... so no good for cartwheeling then. I've put MIP in a temporary spot so I can build her a dedicated structure. I don't think I'll be putting in a Tara Pillar but we were thinking something of a similar diametre... we were thinking of putting a set of large arbours along the path leading to the house, avenue style, with each post having a helical structure about 50-70cm in diametre 'wound' around each post Hmmmm Kind of like this:

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How do you think MIP would go around this style of pillar Meryl?

This way the stems don't have to be wound horizontally (if that makes sense) or as tightly but can instead be spiralled up in a more gentle manner. I think it would be fairly easy to put a helical structure like this around an arbour post? What do you think? I have no fences here that would be a suitable support as there is livestock on the other side of them all and I really wanted it near the house to exploit the reputed fragrance (and I've got climbers all over the walls of the house already. Maybe I could move 'Altissimo' and grow it as a shrub instead of against the wall as a climber... it's doing so nicely though I don't really want to move it Hmmmm).

I've been thinking how you would make a structure like this and have come up with using lengths of threaded rod the diametre of the helix and drilling through the post and fixing it in place with large washers and nuts in either side of the post. Then, using strips of steel about 3mm thick and about 20mm wide, drill holes in the strips at the ends and where they cross over and attach these to the arms with washers and nuts (and bolts on the intersecting strips) on either side in a similar fashion finished off with a couple of coats of killrust paint.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Guest on 24th September 2009, 08:01

Simon my MIP is trained around a smallish (5 foot) rusty obelisk and she is lovely. Blooms all along each arm. My two Madames do not have thick canes at all. It is only a smallish steel obelisk, nothing like your impressive structure, near my front door (I bought it from a local sculptor and it is rusty steel which suits my hourse) and she is in bloom now with a purple clematis about to join her. My other MIP is under a tree and trails along a fence but the same growth habit.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by rosemeadow on 24th September 2009, 08:55

Your garden sounds lovely, Violet.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Admin on 24th September 2009, 20:13

Pamela Smile... It's LOVELY to hear from you again. Karen, believe me, all the photos I've seen of Pamela's garden are truly an inspriation.

Pamela, I didn't get any of those gigantea cuttings to strike, but I did get one graft to take. It's just started to burst and is growing very strongly. Did you ever do your pollination with Pierre de Ronsard? Now's the time to start thinking about this Thumbsup

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Billndee on 25th September 2009, 20:48

Can someone give me a phonetic spelling for "Pereire"? I would love to be able to pronounce it correctly.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Admin on 25th September 2009, 21:16

According to Alicia, my resident linguistic expert, 'Pereire' should be pronounced 'per-rare-er' and is a common Spanish name (the name of a friend of ours from Corsica).


Last edited by Simon on 25th September 2009, 21:40; edited 1 time in total

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by rosemeadow on 25th September 2009, 21:39

I didn't realise that was you Pamela. I am glad to see you here !
Simon, I have visited Pamela's very beautiful house and garden, also the wonderful scenery. Thanks again for having had me stay with you, Pamela.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Guest on 4th October 2009, 19:29

Hello Simon and Karen

I am sorry that I am not very much of a forum-er but I am just so busy coping with this garden that I am run off my feet. But it is starting to look lovely and slowly approaching the idea in my head when I first saw this place which was an empty planning board. This year I am every so slightly ahead of the massive weeds - slowly getting there with my thick newspaper and lucerne mulch everywhere. Just had another chook die (a few that I have had for 6 years) and so Mimi got buried under a baby Rosette de Lizy that is really just a twig or two.

I will take some photos in a few weeks and post.

Hope you all are getting a bit of this rain.

Glad you got some budwood of Gigantea Simon - I moved my plant and it is now doing OK although is small.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Admin on 10th October 2009, 21:36

Talking about the gigantea Pam.. this is it:

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This is REALLY strange to me... I did this bud last year when I received the budwood from you Pam, and it sat there and did nothing until just a few weeks ago. Then it started shooting madly and is now about 30cm long. To my amazement it has put out a bud! I know they would normally flower about now anyway... but... this little bud has only been growing for about 4-5 weeks...

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 10th October 2009, 21:53

Inspector Cluso here, Any ideas on the origin of Pam's Gigantea, it would be nice to family tree it backwoods to find it's source, if only for me.
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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Ozeboy on 11th October 2009, 07:55

Simon, that's the sort of growth I am getting here with the Tea's, quite incredible. I cut the first growth from the bud off at around 2ft and now have the second side shoot above the top of a 2ft stake. I just had to use bamboo stakes to stop them from breaking off.

I get the best results by budding late March and activating them in spring around mid August. Before retirement I used to plant Multiflora sticks in Christmas holidays and bud over Easter or a weekend in April.
Budding in spring (November) and activating 6 to 8 weeks later has never produced the growth of autumn budded roses for me.
No I don't T bud, might be faster but there are better methods I have found.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by rosemeadow on 13th October 2009, 23:40

Hi Pam, I look forward to seeing your photos.
I am busy too weeding and mulching my already established gardens, so I can take some photos when my roses are in full bloom.
Simon, can you take a photo of your R. gigantea when it blooms, please ?
Although I might have a bloom in the near future, as Bruce gave me a plant of this rose !
I have seen Bruce's young grafted Teas, they are full steam ahead with growth.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Admin on 14th October 2009, 20:27

No worries Karen. This is the first time I will have gigantea flowering here so I'm going to document its first flower anyway. Normally I would pinch the first flower of a newly grafted rose off to allow the plant to channel the energy into growing instead of flowering. This plant, however, is budded onto a very strongly growing multiflora plant so has a massive system to drive it. I haven't removed it yet and I figured this is the reason why it is flowering and growing so strongly... it's being driven by a 3 year old root system on a plant that is 4ft x 4ft. I'll perform an aerial layer as the season goes on a bit instead of removing it totally as a cutting as I don't want to lose it. This first flower will be removed just as it opens (and has been photographed) so I can collect the pollen.

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

Post by Billndee on 16th October 2009, 22:17

Ozeboy wrote:

I get the best results by budding late March and activating them in spring around mid August. Before retirement I used to plant Multiflora sticks in Christmas holidays and bud over Easter or a weekend in April.
Budding in spring (November) and activating 6 to 8 weeks later has never produced the growth of autumn budded roses for me.
No I don't T bud, might be faster but there are better methods I have found.
Hi Ozeboy, I would like to ask you a few Q's here.
If you don't T bud what do you do? i would like to use a method that gives me better results.
And what do you mean by "activate"? Chop the head off the rootstock?

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Re: 'Madame Isaac Pereire'

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