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Companion Plants

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Re: Companion Plants

Post by neptune on 6th September 2013, 20:51

Dimity Cottage wrote:
There are different varieties available some being Perennial.
Can you please tell us which is best for the garden

Let me know if you get sick of me putting up these little Tit Bits.
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by Dimity Cottage on 6th September 2013, 21:25

The Variety Roman Chamomile, Chamaemelum nobile is the Evergreen Perennial variety, approx. 30cms tall, with attractive yellow centred white flowers in Spring/Summer. This is the variety used for making tea, it has a calming effect and helps with sleep. The feathery green leaves have a scent reminiscent of apples.

The variety 'Treneague' is non-flowering and is often used to grow paths, lawns & ornamental seats.

The variety Dyer's Chamomile, Anthemis tinctoria is a Hardy Perennial to approx. 40cms

The Variety German Chamomile, Matricaria recutita is an Annual to 45cms, this variety is used to make a calming tea.


Last edited by Dimity Cottage on 7th September 2013, 18:09; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by SueH on 7th September 2013, 17:44

Dianne, is it better to grow this from seed or buy a mature plant?

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Re: Companion Plants

Post by Dimity Cottage on 7th September 2013, 18:15

Hi Sue, You will find I have listed a couple more varieties of Chamomile above. Regarding plant or seed - I do prefer to buy seed as you will get a heck of a lot more plants for your money. Also I try to buy Organic seed when it is available. And if you decide to plant between pavers or as a lawn, you can sow direct & they sprout quite quickly.
Enjoy your planting.
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by SueH on 7th September 2013, 18:39

Thank you, never thought of that! I always try to buy organic seeds. Bought some rather "different' sunflower seeds from my worm juice lady! Will see if she has Roman
Chamomile; she has a very large selection.

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Re: Companion Plants

Post by silkyfizz on 10th September 2013, 10:30

Just how invasive is comfrey? I've been reading some horror stories and am loathe to introduce something I'll live to regret. Is it better in a large pot?
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by Dimity Cottage on 10th September 2013, 11:43

Invasive, well that depends on your term for invasive & how you grow it. If you like you could plant it into an old tyre. That will get it up off the ground. Put weed mat under it. If you are on a farm or a large block, use a tractor tyre. That way you could also plant other things into it as well and make a really nice Herb Garden or Vegie Patch around it. I can imagine that you could make it look quite good. Regarding the plant itself - Yes you will probably have it forever as if you break the root off another plant will often come on. I think that Comfrey is one of those Plants that is great planted beside the Compost Heap as that is where it can be used all the time. If you only have a small garden, plant it in a pot.
Enjoys the benefits as they do
outweigh the negatives.
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by silkyfizz on 10th September 2013, 15:16

Thanks Dianne, helpful information. As I'm on a suburban block I'll put it into a large pot near the compost bin. I'm looking forward to using the leaves in the compost. Another couple of questions: does it self seed? (I have read that this can be a problem too) If so do I need to harvest before it blooms? Also, how often can you pick the leaves for the compost?
Thanks for sharing, it's great to be able to tap into your knowledge.
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by SueH on 10th September 2013, 16:23

 

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Re: Companion Plants

Post by Dimity Cottage on 10th September 2013, 17:04

Hi Sue, So long as the plant is growing well and there are lots of leaves I would keep using them for the compost. Regarding the seeds dispersing. I would let it flowers for the Bees & other Beneficial Insects to enjoy, but I would certainly cut the stems off after the flowers have finished & before the seeds have time to disperse & the birds get hold of them. I tried to upload some photos of my garden and the Auriculas but I just couldn't work out how to do it. Some people wanted the name of my Rose in my Avatar, it is Princess Alexandra of Kent it is a David Austin. I am going to put it on my list for next years plantings.
Enjoy your Gardening.
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by silkyfizz on 10th September 2013, 17:30

Thanks Dianne, great to know what to do and how to make the most of comfrey.
I first saw Princess Alexandra of Kent at last years Nov show of Rose Society of Vic. I fell in love with it then and still go a bit gaga when I see it now. What a gorgeous thing it is. I'll have it somehow, someday.
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by SueH on 10th September 2013, 18:38

Ditto!! Roses 

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Re: Companion Plants

Post by Dimity Cottage on 11th September 2013, 06:47

SOAPWORT - A fabulous Companion Plant, a pretty pink perennial Phlox. Soapwort was one of the things used as soap before the 1800's as soap was not commercially available until after that.
It contains a soapy substance called Saponin, when it is boiled up it releases the Saponin into the water and you have liquid soap. You can use every bit of the plant flowers, stalks, leaves, roots & all.
It grows almost anywhere in Sun to Semi-Shade, in a compost rich soil - approx. 1mx1m, it needs to be kept in an area that you don't mind if it gets away a bit, but it is very pretty so can be picked for the vase, Beneficial Insects loves it as well, don't plant it near a pond, river or stream as it is poisonous to fish.
It is used as a repellent against - Aphids, Ants, Whitefly, Red Spider, Mealy Bug. Place all parts of the plant into a saucepan, cover with water and boil up for 20mins, you with end up with a sticky solution that can be strained and watered down and used as a spray, or down ant holes.
Soapwort will Benefit any Plants grown near it for its insect repelling properties. It is used in Museums to clean such things as tapestries, furniture, & other rare and priceless objects. You can also use it to make shampoo for yourself or horses or pets, as a face washes, detergents and any other products you need a gentle soap for - but that is getting away from gardening.
Happy Companion Planting
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by SueH on 11th September 2013, 11:32

Nooo, not really Dianne! Can I plant it in a large pot?

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Re: Companion Plants

Post by Dimity Cottage on 11th September 2013, 11:42

Are we talking about the Comfrey or the Soapwort - Both can go into a large pot. The Soapwort is so pretty when in flower, so don't cut it up for use until all the flowers have died off.
Enjoy flower
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by SueH on 11th September 2013, 12:50

Wont do! It was the Soapwort actually, sorry I wasn't very clear. Thought I'd grow the Comfrey near the compost.

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Re: Companion Plants

Post by Dimity Cottage on 18th September 2013, 18:35

ROSEMARY – Rosemary is an essential oil and one of the most powerful oils available.
It is used as a natural insecticide to treat fleas, weevils, flies, mozzies, ants, moths & garden baddies, to name but a few.
It makes a wonderful Companion Plant for Beans, Cabbages & Carrots, it will help to keep those nasties away.
A strong tea of Rosemary can be made by filling a bucket with sprigs of Fresh Rosemary covered with boiling water. Let sit and cool then strain & add ˝ a cup of soap flakes to the tea. This can then be sprayed on Roses, Vegetables, Horses & their Blankets, Dog Kennels etc.
Rosemary sprigs can be used when you have an ant problems, just rub them along your windowsills & countertops, you will not only help rid yourself of ants but also have that wonderful fresh scent. I keep a lovely jug of Rosemary on my kitchen top near the sink.
As Rosemary is a member of the Lamiaceae family, other members include (Lavender, Basil and Sage), you may find cross pollination occurs on occasions and you may end up with a few VISITORS in the garden, but grow them on and see what you get.
Some say Rosemary helps with Hair Growth so you people out there who may be follickly challenged you might like to cut a few sprigs and rub it where you want it to grow.
GOOD LUCK…..Happy Gardening
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by SueH on 18th September 2013, 19:23

LOL ,, The mind boggles!! LOL - Um chest maybe?! LOLOL
Seriously thought, it is a wonderful herb and so versatile.Afro 

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Re: Companion Plants

Post by SueH on 19th September 2013, 18:25

Dianne, Can you recommend a book about companion plants and also one about Moon Gardening please?  

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Re: Companion Plants

Post by Dimity Cottage on 19th September 2013, 18:51

 Hi Sue, Yes I can recommend a couple of books -

The Moon Planting Book I use is fabulous, it will take you through to 2017 for planning, the book is - Easy Organic Gardening and Moon Planting by Lyn Bagnall, a Scribe Publication, Australian Author. I got mine on Fishpond, no delivery charge on Fishpond.

A couple of Companion Books I use are - Rondale's Ultimate Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening (probably more gardening but great), The Complete Guide to Companion Planting, Everything You Need to Make Your Garden Successful by Dale Mayer an Atlantic Publishing Group Inc.
These are not too in depth & are plain & easy to follow. Hope this helps.
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by Dimity Cottage on 3rd October 2013, 17:22

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MARIGOLDS Tagetes & Tagetes minuta - As Companion Plants are one of the World's Best Insecticides. There is a Marigold for every spot in the garden, of all shapes and sizes. I scatter my seed anywhere I would like them to come up, you will usually find after the initial planting they will self seed.
Marigolds will help ward off Ticks, Fleas, Ants, Cockroaches, Mealy Bug, Whitefly, Red Spider Mite, Bedbugs, Lice & More.
Grow Marigolds around the Chook Pen, Stables and where your Dog sleeps.
Torn up Flowers, Stalks and Leaves can be places under Lettuce, Spinach and any other Leafy Vegetables in the Vegetable Patch to deter Slugs. Also spread along paths or on the edge of the Patch. Grow around your Rose and Flower Gardens to help guard against the nasties.

Marigold Spray Recipe - for Aphids, Whitefly, Mealy Bug
Fill your Bucket with Fresh Marigold Leaves, Stalks & Flowers. Pour over enough Boiling Water to Cover. Allow to seep overnight. Next Day Strain and add 1/2 a cup of Soap Flakes.

A tea can be used to help keep away Ants and Cockroaches by omitting the Soap Flakes and pouring the Tea down Ant Holes and around where you want to deter cockroaches.

Onion, Chilli & Marigold Spray - for Aphids, Mealy Bug, Whitefly & Red Spider Mite
In a Food Processor, Mix together 5-6 Large Onions, 10-12 Large Hot Chillies, seeds and all. Cut or Tear up 1/2 a Bucket of Marigolds and cover with 1 Bucket of Boiling Water and add the Chilli and Onions. Allow to steep overnight and drain the next day and add 1/2 cup of Soap Flakes.

Enjoy Companion Gardening....  
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Re: Companion Plants

Post by SueH on 3rd October 2013, 18:26

Thanks again Dianne - oh, apologies, meant also, to thank you for your book recommendations. Haven't had time to chase Fishpond up until now. Looking forward to a good read!  
ps. Tried rubbing the rosemary stalks around one of my doors to deter ants and guess what .... it really works!! LOL Thanks! Happy Dance 

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Re: Companion Plants

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