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R. Laxa

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R. Laxa

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 9th August 2013, 12:31

This thread will not interest many. Some will find some of the topic a point of discussion. I am of the belief this rose will become a popular rootstock in the near future, There are many forms, just to show a few,
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by neptune on 9th August 2013, 14:54

To open discussion.......Dave, why do you think this rose will become a popular rootstock
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Guest on 9th August 2013, 15:03

its already been used as rootstock for a long time. reasons for use( able to withstand high pH and wet soils)

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 9th August 2013, 15:51

Very versatile stock, I believe it will be seed grown, no virus issues, just for starters
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Balinbear on 9th August 2013, 18:30

09.08.2013
Ozroz wrote:its already been used as rootstock for a long time. reasons for use( able to withstand high pH and wet soils)
We need a rootstock that will take low PH and wet and dry soil (depending on where we plant it). I guess Multiflora cover that reasonably well.
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Ozeboy on 10th August 2013, 04:25

Must be good in cold wet climates I have used a lot of different climbing roses as understocks but preparation time, how well they strike and how thorny are a few factors to consider. We live in a hot dry country particularly inland. Fortuniana keeps popping up as best for dry WA so I'm trialing 25 this season for NSW.
Multiflora is excellent as it grows so fast, is thornless and strikes well. Compatability is good depending which rose is grafted on it. A proven performer on the East Coast.
Would be interesting to give Laxa a try here, it appears the choice for cold wet climates?

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 10th August 2013, 06:33

Bruce, the idea is to grow it from seed and thus eliminate virus, I am in contact with people in England about it. The stock I saw was only 3 months old and was being budded when we were there. Our climate is one thing I am in talks with them about.
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Guest on 10th August 2013, 08:17

The virus comes from poor horticultural practices, most of the time its the scion which is infected and was taken of virused stock plants. The roses I grow out of town, no rose bush from another source is allowed in that area, this area is my clean zone and hopefully never have virus's or any othere bug. I never want to be responsible for the introduction of something nasty to another area

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 10th August 2013, 10:11

What about the time comes they are budded ?
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Guest on 10th August 2013, 10:27

I am confident with the guy in Holland otherwise Daniel would not use him in his plant production. No matter how desperate I am for certain pollen, I will not use pollen from RMV infected plants. It only takes one plant cultivar infected with anything, and your quality control is in tatters, not worth the risk of losing everything a person has worked for.

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 10th August 2013, 11:12

I was more thinking of your material here, arew you going to bud any of yours
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Guest on 10th August 2013, 12:15

I grow my own Multiflora and Indica major rootstock, both are good. Again both roots stocks are out of town in the clean zone.

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Ozeboy on 10th August 2013, 16:19

David, I have been using seed grown Multiflora for some time now and very shortly will finish bringing in others cuttings. I'm the guy that argued with you about viruses when you didn't accept it even existed.

I noticed Heritage Roses in the US advertised plants to be virus cleansed. It would appear they have had the heat treatment for 30 days, then budded onto virus free understocks. I did hear this treatment didn't guarantee the virus was killed.

It's very difficult to have plants tested but I made up a hot box with thermostat plus or minus 1C and was set to do the test and see if it worked but without a guaranteed test perhaps I would be wasting my time. Anyway I'm 99% sure I will give it a go this summer when the electricity bill won't go up a great deal.

There are a lot of people in the industry that are not aware of the virus and they do not have best practices in place to control it. Warren, go to the top of the class your control system is what everyone should do.


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Re: R. Laxa

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 11th August 2013, 07:17

"David, I have been using seed grown Multiflora for some time now and very shortly will finish bringing in others cuttings. I'm the guy that argued with you about viruses when you didn't accept it even existed."
Bruce this a quote from your earlier post, yes we have argued over the fact of a virus, I am not convinced one way or the other, my mind is open as everyone's should be, awareness is the key.
This is why I am looking at the "possible" advantages of "Laxa". As mentioned previously I am in talks with the breeder at Harkness's about this.
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Ozeboy on 12th August 2013, 21:44

David, you are the only person on this planet that doesn't accept the fact that viruses are present in a lot of our roses.
Might be a good idea to tell Henry Kuska you can't make up your mind re rose viruses, he would be very impressed.

I'll bet that extremely busy breeder at Harkness's couldn't control himself when he got an Email from you regarding Laxa.

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 13th August 2013, 06:16

My mind is open to all things Bruce. One has to look at all aspects and make an informed judgement, as I said "yes it is out there" but to what extent, I do not go down the alarmist route.

I'll bet that extremely busy breeder at Harkness's couldn't control himself when he got an Email from you regarding Laxa.
David Hunt the breeder in question Bruce is not laughing, a very open and forthright man, along with Mr. Austin, which again I had the pleasure of meeting whilst in England. These people look outside the square and share information unlike other breeders I have spoken to or tried to. People like the two David's that breed roses encourage others. Even though Simon V is not here he was always willing to share his knowledge and material, just an example on interaction between rosy people.
As for Henry I ask him for things to read to expand my mind on the subject. At times I have asked his permission to post things here that he has posted on other forums as he is a member of many forums.
Here is another example of "non" information sharing Bruce, try contacting Kordes, not even the courtesy of return email.
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Ozeboy on 13th August 2013, 08:47

David, it takes all types, it's been a bit dull here on Rosetalk while you were away. Do you really think Kordes would reply to you when their L/H doesn't know what their R/H is doing. They are so secretive about their breeding not disclosing the parents of their seedlings. What a wank
really, because by the time their seedlings are out in commerce they are breeding something quite different.
Roses are such mongrels genetically there's little chance of duplication.

Seeing you are contacting people all over the world re Laxa and understocks give Brownell in USA an Email as they did have a lot to do with roses for Canada that they called the "Sub Zero Series". They might even reply.

It is a shame some companies do not share information because the world is a much smaller place now and diseases are having no trouble jumping from one continent to another.

I'm scaling back my rose operation and trying to get rid of 550 roses in 8"pots. I'm getting too old for all this and want to concentrate breeding.

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Guest on 13th August 2013, 18:38

Dont just worry about Kordes being secretive Austin when he lists his new registered roses alot of the time there is this ( undisclosed or seedling). Altough it is good some times to know the parents ,it is not really that important , because once you start using a parent or parents  a few times in breeding cycles , you sort of know its abilities. That is why its important to realise the sequence of patterns emerging to do well and put in the hard yakka your self to appreciate what you have created.

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Ozeboy on 13th August 2013, 20:31

Warren, it takes so long to get a seedling in commerce. I'm beginning to think I won't live long enough even if I get a seedling with everything, health (Test northern trial garden),bloom shape, colour, fragrance etc.
Looking like short ,fat, overdressed and doused in perfume.
All this takes around 10 years or just keep some of the nice ones for personal gratification.
The big companies have some of the top experienced, university educated people breeding their roses and turn out around five new roses a season from thousands of seedlings. There is a difference, they are breeding for the unusual and not one that looks like the 50,000 already registered.

Even David Austin who David thinks walks on water has very little variety in a lot of his new ones. His Abraham Darby is just so good here compared to his other more recent releases. Certainly a guy to be admired for his marketing and promotional skills.

What's this got to do with Laxa, absolutely nothing but sometimes I like to think out loud and hope to get a response from one of the breeders.

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 13th August 2013, 20:57

Think out loud as much as you like Bruce, yes Mr Austin can nearly walk on water. For what he has achieved in forty odd years it has taken Kordes and others a few years to see he has something which they are trying to copy, best of luck to them.
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by neptune on 13th August 2013, 21:09

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 13th August 2013, 21:14

Not today John, tomorrow we will get back on track about 'R. Laxa'
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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Guest on 14th August 2013, 07:49

Dave I have been frowned in this country on in the type of rose I breed, people think a rose should look like those at an exhibition rose show, but in fact in Europe, it is the opposite. Peoples tastes in roses on the continent are Polyantha types and the more you can get them to look like roses produced in the 1700 to late 1800's with the big perfume , you will not look back. That is why Austin has done so well.

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Guest on 14th August 2013, 08:01

The big companies have some of the top experienced, university educated people breeding their roses and turn out around five new roses a season from thousands of seedlings.
 
I have almost said this on another site which I visit, where the scientific jargon is flung around very often. Having a little science knowledge is benificial, I think you can be too clinical.  What it boils down is to have the eye to physically see changes occurring within the offspring. You breed chooks and you know what characteristics  are wanted in certain breeds, this is done by looking (visually) at the traites you are after, roses are the same thing. No science degree can give you that ability.
 
And this started out as a rootstock thread LOL

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Re: R. Laxa

Post by Ozeboy on 14th August 2013, 18:27

Warren, thanks for your post above, it is amazing the variation in techniques and methods practiced by rose breeders. I've been breeding one type of chook for 72 years and have just come to the conclusion I know very little about them. Will hopefully start to learn a lot now.
Have been rose breeding for 7 years so you could say I know very little. Your reference to stock or rose sense has been stored away for use this coming season.

Sorry all back to Laxa.

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