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Talking about Fortuniana

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Talking about Fortuniana

Post by paulh on 18th December 2012, 00:53

With a lot of talk about Fortuniana root stock I came across an American article on this subject.
An interesting part of this article I have pasted below, pertaining to the growth of the root system. I can see how do well here in Perth with our heat. We are told to give a deep water less often than frequent light watering, which encourages the roots to go deeper. Now this makes sense with our crappy sandy soil, shallow roots just don't cope in our soil. Anyways I think it's worth a read.

Fortuniana Rootstock
I have learned through trial and error that no other rootstock compares with
Fortuniana for the south. It is resistant to nematodes, which are prevalent here in the south. Nematodes attack the root system of roses and will destroy it. Fortuniana is also resistant to other root diseases. The Fortuniana root system is much larger than those of other rootstocks; its roots are fibrous and extend out from the plant much farther than other rootstocks. Occasionally, I have found that the rootstock will form a tap root which I would compare to a tap root on a pine tree - I have pulled up tap roots from my older bushes that were up to four feet long. This massive root system is what makes Fortuniana the choice for serious rose growers. The blooms will be larger and the plants will produce more leaves, which in turn, will make the plant grow larger. I have Fortuniana root stock roses in our garden that are over 12 years old, and continue to get larger each year. I have also found that after the first year, the rootstock is as winter hardy as most other root systems.
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paulh

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Re: Talking about Fortuniana

Post by Ausrose on 6th January 2013, 06:27

For some years I have been trying to get hold of a fortuniana bush as a source of rootstock. Last year I purchased two bushes which are thriving in pots. Within the year I hope to take cuttings for rootstock. Although I live on the east coast I live on a flood plain which has 8ft of sandy loam. It will be interesting to see if the fortuniana is successful as other root stock in my garden.


Last edited by Ausrose on 19th February 2013, 22:20; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Talking about Fortuniana

Post by maree on 6th January 2013, 07:52

Paul and Ausrose on American sites , i keep coming across own root / grafted, especially with all the disease over there , do any breeders do own root here and is it better ?
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Re: Talking about Fortuniana

Post by Ausrose on 6th January 2013, 13:55

The budding of roses became popular because it enabled nurseries to get their product developed to market in a much quicker time and remember time is money to a commercial operation. However this is changing as the cost of budding roses is becoming relatively expensive and it is a skill that takes time to develop so growing roses from cuttings is becoming more appealing to the nurseries. The majority of roses in Australia produced for sale are budded roses however in recent years Swanes have sold the Icebergs on their own roots. The relative merits of the two systems of producing roses depends on who you talk to. My only comparative assessment relates to Tineke and I have found after 5 years their is little difference between the bushes and the flowers of the two methods.


Last edited by Ausrose on 6th January 2013, 14:21; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Talking about Fortuniana

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 6th January 2013, 14:13

Prior to the budding/grafting system we have at present all(most) roses were grown from cuttings or at the extreme, seeds, lots were hand me downs to friends or other nurserymen(no slight on women here). The idea of budding/grafting was the way to get a plant/bush out to the public quick. We here in Australia have only a handful of cutting grown nurseries. In the US they sell thousands, which are called 'bands'(2" tubestock).
IMO some plants(roses) do well on rootstock others are better as cuttings/own root. As an example 'Peace'HT does well either way. The rose the world loves 'Iceberg' is the same. In this next bit of text I do not know the answer, others will or do. The rose we call 'miniature) will always grow from cuttings and sucker well.
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Re: Talking about Fortuniana

Post by hariet~rose on 6th January 2013, 14:38

Thanks for that info on growing on own rootstocks.. it really helps to know about the successful ones as they are the most reliable in the face of frosts .. i.e. after burn down you get the same rose back .. and not Dr Huey etc..
I can add that Bloomfield Abundance does well on its own roots, as does Martine Guillot (it happened accidentally Very Happy), Seafoam, TessofD'Urb (ok it was another accident pig)
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Re: Talking about Fortuniana

Post by paulh on 6th January 2013, 15:18

[quote="hariet~rose"]Thanks for that info on growing on own rootstocks.. it really helps to know about the successful ones as they are the most reliable in the face of frosts .. i.e. after burn down you get the same rose back .. and not Dr Huey etc..
I can add that Bloomfield Abundance does well on its own roots, as does Martine Guillot (it happened accidentally Very Happy), Seafoam, TessofD'Urb (ok it was another accident pig) [/quote

No worries hariet, information is wisdom
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Re: Talking about Fortuniana

Post by Ozeboy on 6th January 2013, 16:03

Striking 'Fortuniana' is difficult and has proven just about impossible for me to achieve a satisfactory success rate. Nearly every attempt has resulted in damping off. I can get about 100% success rate by grafting it onto Multiflora and planting deep hence using the Multiflora as a nurse understock. Unfortunatly the growth from the Fortuniana is then numerous with 5 or 6 canes appearing from the graft. This would then become a suckering nightmare.

After corresponding with a nurseryman from WA who uses 'Fortuniana'
my success rate didn't improve. I have never tried to root it during our hot summers in propagation sand which could be worthwhile. Until I can get 95% success rate it remains non viable commercially. No doubt some have mastered rooting it possibly with hydroponic flood and drain methods.

Ownroot or grafted? Whatever is the best method at the time to achieve a good result. Old roses and minatures usually grow well from cuttings but some modern HT's have to be grafted. As a rustler of old and rare roses I get more reliable results from budding. When I drive 200 miles to rescue an old rose in a cemetery I will bud it as ownroot is much less reliable. I've seen gardeners with a half wooden beer barrel containing 75 cuttings with 99% gone black for one success. Recently I received by mail a 25 to 30mm long cutting with 2 buds on it. The two buds produced two very healthy 'Lady Woodward' bushes. Very few people can bud well so ownroot is their only option.

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