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Hello from Nevrdream

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Hello from Nevrdream

Post by nevrdream on 29th June 2011, 20:31

Hi everyone,

I'm your definite newbie, both to rose gardening and to this forum. I am having a ball daydreaming what an extra couple of acres of garden (and the dollars to match lol) would look like with my dream roses planted in it. In reality I have a heavy clay soil loaded with rocks, so this is my winter of discontent...I am building raised beds ready for next winter and planting a bundle of annuals to keep me amused and colourful in the meantime...

Kids are demanding to go to bed, so I must away.
Cheers
Ann


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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 29th June 2011, 20:49

Welcome Ann, you have what is called a blank canvas to work with and with help from our wonderful members it will come. Enjoy
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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by neptune on 29th June 2011, 21:07

Don't lose site of those dreams ...you just never know Ann.... Smile
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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by AutumnDamask on 29th June 2011, 21:10

Hi Ann,
Have fun with all your plotting... Wave

(Don't rocks count as "good drainage"? Wink )
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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by Admin on 29th June 2011, 21:40

Don't count heavy clay out eiter - roses love clay!!!!

Welcome aboard Mexican Wave


Last edited by Simon on 30th June 2011, 20:19; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by Barbara B on 30th June 2011, 08:03

I agree - roses love clay. Welcome to the forum.
Barbara B

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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by nevrdream on 30th June 2011, 10:06

Really? Everything I've read says clay is the enemy to be fought at all costs. Admittedly I've planted out a couple of sad little roses, who hated the spot they were in last summer and resolutely refused to grow let alone flower, into the sun drenched clay and they have perked up. Of course I have no idea what they are by now...

Excellent!

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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by Admin on 30th June 2011, 20:18

Yes, roses quite like clay soils. Their roots are strong and pervasive, easily able to establish in even quite heavy clay. Of course, there is clay, and then there is CLAY [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

It takes some pretty serious clay to stop a rose though Wink

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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 30th June 2011, 22:28

IMO, they like clay,but, they do appreciate improving the clay.
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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by OzRose on 1st July 2011, 03:00

Hullo Ann and welcome to the wonderful world of rose growing.
I would rather have clay as my starting base than sand when establishing a garden.
Western Australia is rather reknown for it's greedy bottomless sandplains , where most of the population live and try to garden . That country swallows mulch and manure and everything else that you throw at it or toss on it like there is no tomorrow. [Neptune is one of the brave souls that grows award winning roses under these conditions , lol]
So did my mum and as kids in the 70's , our August school holidays were spent spreading huge [like were delivered by an 8 ton tipper] loads of chook manure and another one of sawdust . We used to alternate each year in how it was spread. One year c.m then s.d and then the next year it would be s.d then c.m on top. LOL talk about the bottomless pits of the west coast plains.
It was a joy when much later in life , I moved to what was my rose growing paradise on the sticky clay hills outside of Donnybrook . Baked like cement in summer and too tacky to dig or walk on in winter.

But OMG give it the gypsum treatment and the pile on the manure [well we had lots and lots of that and also huge amounts of shredded newspaper that was put through my mulcher . The garden just forged ahead.
The benefits of value adding to a clay soil are far greater and much longer lasting than trying to build up a sandy one ; I hope I never have to go back to trying to garden in sand as long as my bum points down.

Good luck and enjoy growing your roses.
cheers. Rosalie

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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 1st July 2011, 06:38

Ah, yes the good stuff called gypsum, if it was me I would lay a good cover of it in now so as the soil(clay) can start working with it for next winter.
Ann, I assume you have a rural supply company near you or maybe an agronimist at the same place, talk to them about different types of gypsum, some have other things in them.
As Rosalie has pointed out about her experience with clay, I would start now with any matter you can get your hands on now.
Just as a side issue, I am on black river soil, very hungry, when it's wet it's wet. when it's dry, cracks appear and I am sure I can see China.
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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by nevrdream on 2nd July 2011, 09:10

Oh wow thanks so much for all that great advice! My Dad's best friend was the local senior agronimist so will get his input into the gypsum. I have been piling on manure, sugar cane mulch, and sandy soily stuff that passed for a garden bed nearby as I get a chance. At least I'm heading in the right direction!

Thanks again everyone I love you

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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 2nd July 2011, 10:40

Ann, when you are talking to your dads friend the agronimist, see if he can do asimple pH test now and just before you plant out next winter. You should see a big difference in the pH and the condition of the soil.
I know it sounds silly but if it was me I would start a garden diary for records of things so you can look back, maybe pictures as well.
One other thing that comes to mind is, you can place any matter in the bed now that will break down. I was taught "if it has lived, it can be placed in the garden". When told this I questioned it and my lecturer, said, human hair has lived so that can be added.
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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by Admin on 2nd July 2011, 19:17

There is only one bit of information missing now Wink

All clays aren't the same and some won't respond to gypsum. Here's a simple test to see if it will:

* Gather a handful of clay and moisten in so it can be squeezed into balls about the size of a marble.

* Drop it in a glass of water and watch it.

* If it falls apart over time it will respond well to gypsum. If it doesn't, not so well.


Last edited by Simon on 2nd July 2011, 20:11; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

Post by Ozeboy on 2nd July 2011, 20:07

nevrdream, if it doesn't fall apart as Simon indicates then railway sleepers on edge could be one solution. They are 8 foot long 8" x 4" so three would be 24" high though I think 16" deep would be OK.
I also hate digging and like the idea of lucerne hay, sheep manure and other things from the compost bin to fill up the 16". Good soil from the creek bank would help give the soil body to hold up the plants.

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Re: Hello from Nevrdream

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