Latest topics
» Has anyone had a similar problem with a rose......
by Ozeboy 21st November 2017, 09:59

» Sad second year roses :(
by The Lazy Rosarian 17th November 2017, 15:40

» what do I need to do?
by eileen0 3rd November 2017, 16:41

» Feeding routines
by carmel 9th October 2017, 10:06

» Two to identify please
by LouiseJB 25th September 2017, 16:02

» rose for sale
by carmel 25th September 2017, 07:46

» Anyone ever heard of this before?
by The Lazy Rosarian 17th September 2017, 16:19

» parole
by Malnewby 14th September 2017, 18:38


Sulmanique (Tea from Bishop's Lodge)

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: Sulmanique (Tea from Bishop's Lodge)

Post by Balinbear on 11th May 2011, 15:19

Larry

The Lady is certianly nice. Unfortunately it is one of the few teas that do not do all that well up our way. Seems to get quite leggy and suffers blackspot more than the others. Flowers are also few and far between.

We have a few of them from different sources. A climbing one that we have does fine but only one out of the 3 or 4 schrubs seems to flower all that much and even then not up to the usual Tea standard.

It probably justs needs a bit more attention than the others so I may just start to look after her a bit better and see what the results are.

Gary
avatar
Balinbear

Number of posts : 1450
Age : 63
Location : Sunshine Coast Queensland
Registration date : 2010-01-30

Back to top Go down

Re: Sulmanique (Tea from Bishop's Lodge)

Post by larryp on 11th May 2011, 17:11

Yeah the Lady very discerning about where she'll consent to flourish and lay down her aristocratic roots. Being one of the later Teas (1910) she has lost some of the vigor of the early teas. being not so content in hot humid climates and contracts a bit of the BS.Mine grows in ine dappled shade of a grafted gum and she soesn't seem to mind a bit of colonial company.

Have heard varying reports about her behaviour here in OZ - sometimes she is most amenable and at others languishes sulkily and refuses to co-operate.

Stangely she is more obliging in the cool of England but apparently you have to get her up against a warm wall.
avatar
larryp

Number of posts : 69
Location : Sydney
Registration date : 2011-05-08

Back to top Go down

Re: Sulmanique (Tea from Bishop's Lodge)

Post by Balinbear on 11th May 2011, 20:01

Thanks for that info Larry.

Our climbing one is up the back near some gum trees and does not get a lot of sun. Maybe that is the clue.

I might move the others this winter and see how they go in a bit more shade. We are in the process of fixing up one of the gardens so I may try her there.
avatar
Balinbear

Number of posts : 1450
Age : 63
Location : Sunshine Coast Queensland
Registration date : 2010-01-30

Back to top Go down

Re: Sulmanique (Tea from Bishop's Lodge)

Post by Admin on 24th July 2011, 22:55

'Lady Hillingdon' loves Tasmania, however, despite its affinity for the Apple Isle it is one Tea that I have tried to strike repeatedly over the past four years and failed every time. People here have been very generous, supplying cuttings for me to try and the closest I've managed to get was a tiny little struck cutting from Meryl that looked like it was going to do well and then up and died on me for no real reason I could see. I will succeed with her one day and grow her own-root. I gave it to my Grandmother for Christmas last year to introduce her to the world of Teas too. By all accounts it seems to be loving a coastal position near Wyong on the NSW Central Coast.

In the pinkish spectrum, 'Monsieur Tillier' is a great Tea. More of a brick red with pink suffused through it but mine still looks primarily pink in a cooler Tassie climate. 'General Schablikine' might be worth a look at too.

I bought 'Marie Van Houtte' hoping to get a Tea that would be a creamy tone in the cooler months and a pink tone in the warmer months. Seems our warmer months are just not warm enough to cause the change. Great rose but basically a cream rose down here. "Adam" is always a nice shade of pink and I'm trying to grow mine as a large shrub. I figured Tea growth is slowed down dramatically down here and their stature reduced so it might make a decent shrub instead of the climber it is usually touted as being.

I've just bought 'MME Lambard' to try for some pink Teas too. I'm very much looking forward to this one taking off. It's still in the minus figures here at night and it's already starting to sprout new growth.

Margaret Furness sent me some cuttings of a range of Teas and the only one I was successful in striking was 'MME Antoine Mari'. I love the pink in this one too and the new growth is a wonderful ruby red.

If you are talking about pink Teas I don't think any discussion would be complete without a mention of 'Lorraine Lee'. I know she has a reputation for mildew but so far I've not seen it in mine. I need to move mine. How do Teas, in general, compare to other roses in the transplant stakes? Mine is three years old and needs a sunnier, more protected spot.

About pink Teas, 'Bon Silene' was mentioned. How does this one do left to its own devices?

Larry, that 'Jean Ducher'/'G. Nabonnnand' is magnificent. Another to put on my wish list. I've tried on a number of occassions to get her to strike but have so far been unsuccessful.

Admin

Number of posts : 3739
Location : Mudgee
Registration date : 2008-02-08

http://www.rosetalkaustralia.com

Back to top Go down

Re: Sulmanique (Tea from Bishop's Lodge)

Post by Balinbear on 25th July 2011, 13:48

Simon

We moved a 'General Schablikine' (a nice understated rose that I like better the Mons Tilier) that was a couple of metres high (and wide) one winter about 5 or 6 years ago. We cut it right back to about half a metre got rid of a few of the stems and shifted it. It was back the same size by the end of the summer and still going strong though not much bigger so it has probably reached its limits.

Most teas seem to move ok. Rozette Delizy is probably the hardest one to shift. Its sulks real bad when you cut it back or try to move. We shifted one and it took a while for it to come back. We had to prune it back hard a couple of months ago as got damaged in a storm. It sent out plenty of new shoots but then suddenly upped and died on us. Mme Lambard is similar yet others don't seem to mind the shift.

Your Pink teas list would also have to include Mamon Cochet, Comtesse Riza de Park, Cottage Hedge Rose ROR (if you have a spare acre or two as she knows how to grow), Mme Berkeley, Mme de Tartas, Mrs B R Cant, Octavis Weld
Souv d'un Ami and Triomphe du Luxembourg. I'm not sure but some may struggle in the cold

Our Bon Seliens are untidy shrubs. You can leave them but they grow a bit lanky. I think itís the higher temperatures. They don't seem to mind a prune.

Itís been a bad 18-24 months for getting cuttings going up our way as it has been hot and wet then suddenly cold and wet. We did 200 "Boarderer cuttings to put around the edges of the gardens and I think I have about 20 left. Usually we have about 95% success rate with them. Funny enough a couple of the G.Nabonands (and its sport Peace 1902) survived and are now in the garden.

Mind you we don't go out of our way with keeping things clean etc so the Black Death is quite common. Probably good in one way as we will end up with too many roses are too many of the one rose though you can never have too many of some of them.
avatar
Balinbear

Number of posts : 1450
Age : 63
Location : Sunshine Coast Queensland
Registration date : 2010-01-30

Back to top Go down

Re: Sulmanique (Tea from Bishop's Lodge)

Post by The Lazy Rosarian on 25th July 2011, 15:48

Just as a side thought Gary, would they(teas) like to be on thier own roots in the long term thing.
Is ther any good reading material about 'teas' history, other than the book from The Tea Bags scratch
avatar
The Lazy Rosarian

Number of posts : 5151
Age : 64
Location : Mudgee, NSW, Australia
Registration date : 2009-01-11

Back to top Go down

Re: Sulmanique (Tea from Bishop's Lodge)

Post by Balinbear on 25th July 2011, 20:48

Dave

A lot of ours are own root and they go really well. I expect that they will last as long as budded ones (even longer depending on the root stock).

I don't know too many books that go into teas very deeply.
avatar
Balinbear

Number of posts : 1450
Age : 63
Location : Sunshine Coast Queensland
Registration date : 2010-01-30

Back to top Go down

Re: Sulmanique (Tea from Bishop's Lodge)

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum